Basic T-Tunic

 

An All Purpose T-Tunic

 


This diagram gives a simple and reasonably authentic pattern for a variety of clothing for men and women. By adjusting the angles of the side seams and sleeves and adding gores of various sizes to the sides or back, you can approximate anything from a Roman tunica to a Burgundian houppelande.

Consider using a washable fabric in cotton, linen, wool or other natural fiber. Although an all-polyester fabric is easy to care for, it may look too modern. Choose natural or slightly muted colors, be careful to avoid fluorescent,. modem hues and patterns.

Use a 60″ wide fabric, or sew two widths of 45″ or 36″ together. Fold the fabric in quarters, with one set of folds at the top and one fold running the long way down the middle of what will become the front (see diagram).

Take the follwing measurements, be sure to add an additional 1/2″ for seams.1) Neck to floor, or wherever you plan to stop, plus 2″ for hem

2) Neck to waist
3) Neck to widest part of chest
4) 1/4 waist plus 1″ ease or more, depending on style
5) 1/4 chest plus 1″ ease or more, depending on sty!e
6) 2″ for an armpit gusset
7) As wide as your most comfortable shirt sleeves

The dotted lines suggest neck and sleeve lines. Pick whichever seems closest to the period you are trying for.

Cut out the tunic. When cutting out the neck opening, it is best to underestimate your head size and cut too small at first. Enlarge the opening little by little until it is the size you want. Remember that a little cutting can make a big differencel

With the right sides (the outside of the fabric) together. sew up the side seams. Put commercial bias tape around the neck opening or face the neck opening with matching fabric. so the fabric does not unravel when you put it on and take it off. Hem the bottom. Put on any trim that you want. Wear it with pants and boots. or over a lighter weight version of the same tumc with narrower sleeves..

t-tunic